Welcome to Butterfly Conservation Warwickshire

The Warwickshire branch of Butterfly Conservation works in partnership with land owners, local authorities, conservation bodies, businesses and the local community to raise awareness about the threats facing our butterflies, moths, their habitats and our natural environment. We provide advice and practical help on how to protect these and other threatened wildlife in the region. We challenge local authorities and business to ensure they consider the natural world upon which we all depend when making decisions about planning applications and land use.

Several butterflies in the region such as the Small Blue, Wood White and Dark Green Fritillary are particularly vulnerable due to habitat loss and population fragmentation resulting in small isolated colonies which become increasingly susceptible to local or regional extinction.

Warwickshire also hosts a wide variety of moths including species such as Sciota hostilis which is found nowhere else in the country.

Become a member today and help us save butterflies, moths and their habitats in Warwickshire, Coventry and Solihull. The branch currently has 580* members. (*Updated 08-07-2020).

Submit your butterfly and day-flying moth records


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Annual Report 2023

Our Annual Report includes butterfly and moth survey data collected by hundreds of volunteers and enthusiasts during the previous year. Published spring 2024.


Butterfly Conservation
The Warwickshire Approach

This book documents, celebrates and shares the many successes the Warwickshire Branch of Butterfly Conservation has had in conserving our rarer butterflies over the past 25 years. It is a manual of techniques, tips and ideas that will help and hopefully inspire others to create and manage habitats and to conserve butterflies.

In addition, the book outlines the fieldcraft that is required to provide the best chance of finding adult butterflies and their immature stages, provides tips on how to identify the difficult species and suggests how to get the maximum enjoyment from your butterfly encounters.

To order your copy, please visit the NHBS website.

This book is dedicated to the memory of Phil Pain (1923-2014). A passionate Warwickshire naturalist and butterfly enthusiast whose generous legacy has enabled this book to be published.

  • Authors: Mike Slater, Keith Warmington
  • ISBN: 9781399941518
  • Format: Hardback
  • Content: 428 pages, colour photos and illustrations
  • Published: December 2022
  • Published by: Butterfly Conservation Warwickshire
  • Printed by: Gomer Press
Butterfly Conservation: The Warwickshire Approach
NHBS

Returning the Chalk Hill Blue to Warwickshire

The Chalk Hill Blue has not been a resident species in Warwickshire since the 19th century but in recent years, individual butterflies have been sighted in the south of the county. Conservation measures in neighbouring Gloucestershire and Oxfordshire have enabled the Chalk Hill Blue to recover some of its former range, meaning that colonies are now found very close to the Warwickshire border.

This innovative project will restore the threatened Chalk Hill Blue butterfly to Warwickshire after an absence of over 100 years.

A male Chalk Hill Blue
Polyommatus coridon

The Chalk Hill Blue

Events 2024

Reserve Open Day

13th July 2024

at Ryton Wood Meadows Butterfly Reserve with Mike Slater

Moth group field meeting at Cross Hands Quarry

13th July 2024

at Cross Hands Quarry with David C G Brown

Moth group field meeting at Welches Meadow NR

27th July 2024

at Welches meadow NR with David C G Brown

Late summer butterfly walk at Cross Hands Quarry

31st July 2024

at Near Little Compton, Moreton in Marsh, GL56 0SP with Mike Slater


First Sightings 2024

05-06-2024 Ringlet

05-06-2024 Marbled White

27-05-2024 Large Skipper

18-05-2024 Meadow Brown

12-05-2024 Small Heath

10-05-2024 Common Blue

07-05-2024 Small Copper

06-05-2024 Brown Argus

04-05-2024 Small Blue

04-05-2024 Dingy Skipper

01-04-2024 Holly Blue

26-03-2024 Small White

25-03-2024 Orange Tip

23-03-2024 Large White

22-03-2024 Speckled Wood

04-03-2024 Comma

15-02-2024 Painted Lady

01-02-2024 Red Admiral

31-01-2024 Brimstone

26-01-2024 Peacock


Latest Records

Please note: From February 2023 all sightings records should be submitted via the iRecord Butterflies app available via the iTunes or Google Store. Find out more here: iRecord at Butterfly Conservation.

02-01-2023 at Grove Rd, Knowle by L Brace.

28-12-2022 at Ryton Pools Park, Bubbenhall by Tara Higgs.

26-11-2022 at Bubbenhall wood by Helen Cormack.

25-11-2022 at Bedworth Arts Centre by Eleanor Sutton.

12-11-2022 at Miners Welfare Park, Bedworth by Eleanor Sutton.

12-11-2022 at CBS Arena by John Coakley.

12-11-2022 at Grove Rd, Knowle by L Brace.

11-11-2022 at Epwell by Mike Slater.

08-11-2022 at Newbold Quarry Park by Phil Parr.

08-11-2022 at Newbold Quarry by Richard Beswick.

Latest News

New three-year conservation project in the midlands

3rd June 2021
A new three-year conservation project, which aims to reverse the declines of spec... more

2020 hailed as a 'good' year for butterflies

31st March 2021
2020 hailed as a 'good' year for butterflies - but conservation scientists warn t... more

Holy Grail of moth recording reappears in Britain

26th September 2019
Numerous recent sightings of a moth that became extinct in the UK in the 1960s, s... more

Mediterranean Blue Butterfly Invades Britain

29th August 2019
Climate change is causing a striking butterfly from southern Europe to appear in ... more

MORE NEWS
Volunteer

Amazing Volunteers

Thanks to our amazing volunteer butterfly recorders here in Warwickshire, we recieved a total of 36,200 records in 2018 from 582 of our 620 tetrads (2km2). This represents an amazing 94% coverage of our region with an average of 11.5 species recorded per tetrad.

Butterfly Conservation Warwickshire 26-04-2019.
VOLUNTEER
Scarlet Tiger © Butterfly Conservation

Watch Out For Tigers

The Scarlet Tiger (Callimorpha dominula) had a fantastic year in 2018. Record numbers of larvae were noted in the spring. Surprisingly larvae were found feeding on Wych Elm beside the car park at Charlecote Nursery, a new larval foodplant for Scarlet Tiger in the UK (M. Halsey, D.C.G. Brown).

Butterfly Conservation Warwickshire Annual Report 2018 pp58.
SCARLET TIGER